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ReachoutASC:BLOG

Our Blog will include contributions from a number of autism specialists. Lynn, Matt and Emma work for Reachout ASC, plus occasional guest bloggers.
We love to hear about your ideas, opinions, challenges and tips so please join in the conversation!
Lynn McCann

Autism and Christmas – Teachers are you ready?

Ok teachers this is THE half term when I get so many more emails about autistic pupils in school and their behaviour.   I wanted to warn you all and help you get ready….but not for the challenging behaviour,  no,  it's supporting your pupils with autism at this time of year that I want to help you with so that the chances of their behaviour changing is lessened.

Of course, the culprit, the trigger for behaviour at this time of year is most likely to be Christmas…not Christmas itself…but the way we DO Christmas.

This is what happens in most primary schools...

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Building good relationships with parents of children with autism.

image from http://quotesgram.com/

"We don't see that behaviour at school"

"He's doing it on purpose, he gets away with it at home"

"There's no structure at home, you know"

These are one or two of the comments I hear regularly.It certainly not from all teachers or teaching staff, and it's certainly not heard in many schools I work with.  But during training discussions or the occasional, off-the-cuff remark, there is an underlying search to find blame for a child with autism's behaviour.   Especially when they have meltdowns – in school or at home.   Or if the behaviour is a controlling or manipulating behaviour.   No teacher likes to think a child is trying to manipulate them.  We are human after all.

Don't get me wrong....
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Supporting mental health for primary age pupils with SEND

My Worry Eater - http://sorgenfresser.com

​ When I was asked to do a two hour presentation on this topic I knew it wouldn't be straight forward.  Mental health is in itself a complex condition – we are all human and all complex in our physical and mental health.  But as we want to build up and develop good habits to look after our physical bodies, then we also should want to do the same for our mental wellbeing.   So I had to ask – what do mainstream class teachers need to know and what advice could I give them that they can implement in their classrooms?

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What makes transition work for ASC pupils?

image from https://tentotwenty.com

Autistic pupils can find everyday transitions difficult, as well as the major transitions that happen. The reasons can include:

  • Not being told what the change will involve,
  • What will be expected of them,
  • How long it's going to last,
  • Perceived or real sensory challenges,
  • Not being given time enough to process the changes or enough information to do so
  • Being so engrossed and comfortable in what they are doing that they cannot seem to switch attention and move to somewhere else,

Transitions can cause a lot of anxiety.

If you're involved in supporting children with every day transitions and often a visual timetable used correctly (see my blog post here) can help enormously and give the pupil some interaction and choices when appropriate. Giving them time to process and information about what to expect is important.  An example is a child who hated lining up because he didn't know where he was going.  He did everything he can to avoid lining up, such as hitting others in the hope he'd be made to stay behind.  For him, we worked with him to ask "Where are we going?";  So he didn't have to rely on an adult telling him, and the behaviours ceased. 

But what about the major transition of moving to the next class or from Primary to Secondary School...

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Being depressed isn’t part of Autism

I love working with autistic children and young people and because I spend a lot of time learning about the autism spectrum and listening to each individual child;  it can be really obvious to me that each autistic person is positive, full of strengths and talents and, given the right support, has lots of potential.

But sometimes their lives are pretty tough.

Children and young people with autism can be carers,  come from chaotic families,  be in care,  suffer from being bullied,  have other conditions such as epilepsy,  can get cancer,  have people in their family pass away,   get ill…. And also suffer from mental illness.

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