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Lynn McCann

Our Blog will include contributions from a number of autism specialists. Lynn, Matt and Emma work for Reachout ASC, plus occasional guest bloggers.
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Lynn McCann

8 ways to help Autistic pupils manage anxiety

I was born worrying, so my mum said.  I don't really know what it is like not to have a million worries running through my head all at once.  Every conceivable disaster is imagined once my brain focusses on a particular thought - There's a downside to having a wild imagination.

But over the years I have learned a lot about anxiety and have many strategies that work for me in coping with it.  I can manage it.  I can recognise when it comes, what it is and fight it off.   Sometimes it goes quietly, sometimes I'm exhausted after the battle.   But I usually win these days.  Anxiety doesn't control me like it used to.

There's an upside to having a wild imagination too.  I can write stories and get really involved in a fantasy world in books and films.  I love craft and sewing.   And I can empathise when others tell me they are anxious all the time too. Anxiety's energy can be harnessed for good.

When I work with children and young people who are autistic, they often seem anxious and many will tell me that they are...

​I do a lot of 1:1 and small group work with children and teenagers and whenever I bring up the topic of emotions, anxiety is what they all feel, often all the time.

When anxiety is there all the time, your brain is connected to the stress hormones and adrenalin that it creates. It is easy to develop an 'I'm either high or low' persona and crave the extremes of emotion because you don't know how to 'be' without it.

Tony Attwood said that people with Asperger's don't know what 'calm' is (at a conference I was attending). This is what the children I work with tell me. It makes us telling them to 'calm down' useless. How can they do something they don't recognise?

This is the approach I have been using and I hope by sharing it you might find something to help your anxious autistic child.

1. One

Make sure first and foremost that it isn't something that you are doing or others are that is causing the anxiety. This includes poor support, poor communication and not recognising their autism needs. It includes bullying and social isolation. Anxiety is not always the child's issue but can be the result of other's poor understanding and support.

2. Two

Check out their sensory sensitivities.This is the first port of call for me as sensory issues can be the source of most of an autistic person's anxiety. Then you can help them find ways to manage the sensory overload or under-responsiveness, change the environmental factors that are contributing and introduce sensory activities.

3. Three

I always explain and teach the child about their sensory systems and about self-regulation. A really good book I use as a reference is "Max and Me". It is written with primary examples but I have used the story theme to talk to secondary pupils really successfully.

4. Four
I have been using Emotion Works (see my blog about this here) to get the pupils identifying and noticing that they are anxious and where or what triggers it. The visuals and components of emotions in the cogs are brilliant and I have used these with primary and secondary children – just adjust the communication accordingly. We use symbols that come with the pack, pictures and talk, depending on the child's communication strengths. It has been good to look at other emotion words that go with anxiety so that we can explore a greater range of situations and give words to the feelings they have.

5. Five
Naming an emotion helps. Recognising that this feeling is anxiety, worry, frustration and what the difference is does take time. Some autistic people have a difficult time recognising emotions. We just take it at the child's pace. We might work with just 2-3 words or (in one particular child) 20-30 words.

6. Six
Introduce positive emotion words. Living with anxiety 24/7 often means that the person doesn't really focus on positive emotions and times that they might be happy or content are rare. Anxiety can be in the background all the time and so to bring positive emotions to the fore needs some training. Mindfulness techniques are really useful but make sure they make sense to the person and aren't too abstract.

7. Seven
Teach the science of anxiety. My pupils love this booklet from GoZen. http://www.gozen.com/understand-your-childs-anxiety-infographic/ I use it with mainstream pupils, sometimes upper KS2 but mainly in secondary. It's there to help the children understand what worry/anxiety is and how it affects us physically and our responses.

8. Eight
The last part is generally the longest and hardest. Finding ways that help us manage anxiety and change it into 'calm' or just 'okay' is okay. There are lots of things to try on the GoZen site but I know this is an individual pursuit. Coming alongside the child and trying things out, maybe recording what experiences help them feel better does take time. Often autistic children will use escapism to hide away from the anxious feelings. This is often in video games, books or You Tube videos. I try to help them find things that don't just stop the anxiety being at the front of their mind for a while (because if that is your only strategy then there is a higher risk of turning to drugs, alcohol and other substances to mask the feelings later in their lives). Tony Attwood again recommends 'fixing the feeling' by putting together a toolkit of strategies that work for them. I put together a booklet with the following headings and together we explore what tools the pupil has.

  • Physical Activity tools(Quick release of emotional energy)
  • Relaxation tools(Slow release of emotional energy)
  • Social tools (People and social activities that make me feel better.)
  • Thinking Tools(Thoughts, problem solving ideas, my favourite things, gratitude)
  • Special Interest Tools(Being an expert in my interest)
  • Sensory Tools(slowing down the messages to my brain)

These are not failsafe strategies and not all these things will help all autistic children. They are just some ideas and strategies I have developed with and for the children I support. It is important that the child 'owns' what they are learning and knows it's about their own self-regulation. Anxiety is a huge part of life and for some, it is the environment that is the issue, not their self-awareness.


Please do share your tips and ideas too. Thank you. 

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Comments 4

 
Guest - Emma W on Saturday, 22 April 2017 21:45

Love these posts Lynn! What do you think of Carol Gray's stuff? I've found Comic Strip Conversations useful (similar idea to Emotion Works with the use of colour coding) as a way of opening up a opportunity for individual CYP to say what they are feeling and explore it; Social stories for CYP who respond well to having a script to frame what's happening and how to navigate it.

Love these posts Lynn! What do you think of Carol Gray's stuff? I've found Comic Strip Conversations useful (similar idea to Emotion Works with the use of colour coding) as a way of opening up a opportunity for individual CYP to say what they are feeling and explore it; Social stories for CYP who respond well to having a script to frame what's happening and how to navigate it.
Lynn McCann on Sunday, 23 April 2017 07:38

Yes Emma, I use social stories and comic strip conversations all the time - I should do a post just about them! There is a chapter on social stories in my primary book. I have hundreds on my computer that I've written for and with children. I find they work best when you write them WITH the child so it really is he issue and perspectivecthey need to work out. Thanks for commenting and keep up the good work you do.

Yes Emma, I use social stories and comic strip conversations all the time - I should do a post just about them! There is a chapter on social stories in my primary book. I have hundreds on my computer that I've written for and with children. I find they work best when you write them WITH the child so it really is he issue and perspectivecthey need to work out. Thanks for commenting and keep up the good work you do.
Ines Lawlor on Tuesday, 25 April 2017 11:32

Great Blog- I also feel anxiety is a huge issue for children with Autism which really exacerbates any sensory processing difficulties they may have . Thanks for the recommendation too- I'm glad you are finding the book useful!
Ines

Great Blog- I also feel anxiety is a huge issue for children with Autism which really exacerbates any sensory processing difficulties they may have . Thanks for the recommendation too- I'm glad you are finding the book useful! Ines
Lynn McCann on Tuesday, 25 April 2017 13:57

Yes Ines, it's a great book. Thanks for commenting.

Yes Ines, it's a great book. Thanks for commenting.
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